202.833.4567

Offices in:

  • Washington
  • London
  • San Francisco
  • Miami
  • New York
Home / Our Successful Whistleblower Cases

Our Successful Whistleblower Cases

Phillips & Cohen has the experience, knowledge and resources that make a difference in the outcome of our clients’ whistleblower cases.

Our record of success — more than $12.1 billion recovered due to our whistleblower cases — is unmatched by any other law firm. We have won for our clients more than $1 billion in whistleblower rewards, including the largest whistleblower award the SEC has made (more than $32 million).

Some of our record-setting whistleblower cases include:

Here is more information about some of our biggest whistleblower cases:

Two whistleblowers represented by Phillips & Cohen LLP provided the government with overwhelming evidence that was at the heart of the government’s case against GlaxoSmithKline — whose global headquarters are in London, UK — and the record-setting $3 billion settlement.

The decision by a Pfizer sales representative in Florida, represented by Phillips & Cohen, to file a whistleblower (“qui tam”) lawsuit in 2003 kicked off the federal and state investigations that led to Pfizer’s record-breaking $2.3 billion settlement.

TAP Pharmaceuticals Inc. (TAP) paid the United States government $559.5 million and state governments $25.5 million to settle one of the largest civil Medicare and Medicaid fraud cases in history. It also paid a $290 million criminal fine — the largest criminal fine ever paid in a healthcare fraud case.

HCA Inc., the nation’s largest for-profit healthcare provider, paid a total of $631 million to the federal government to settle Medicare fraud charges made by two whistleblowers represented by Phillips & Cohen who alleged that the company had inflated expenses for reimbursement claimed in annual Medicare “cost reports.”

Phillips & Cohen represented a sales representative from Ohio in a whistleblower lawsuit against Cephalon Inc. which alleged illegal marketing practices, culminating in a $425 million settlement and a guilty plea.

A whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen LLP prompted a federal investigation into the business practices of DaVita Healthcare Partners and resulted in DaVita paying $400 million to settle civil charges involving kickbacks to doctors.

TRW Inc.’s efforts to stop a scientist from revealing his research findings about faulty electronic components the company sold to the government for military and intelligence-gathering satellites were the basis for a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen. Northrop Grumman Corp., which acquired TRW, settled for $325 million.

The impetus for the massive federal investigation that led to a $302 million settlement by Quest Diagnostics Inc. was a “qui tam” (whistleblower) lawsuit by a California businessman and biochemist, represented by Phillips & Cohen.

A whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen exposed the practice of “yield-burning” in the municipal bond market. Dozens of investment banks paid more than $200 million to the federal government to settle the charges, including 17 investment banks that paid about $140 million.

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power paid Los Angeles County, the Los Angeles Unified School District, the Los Angeles Community College District and certain state agencies a total of $160 million to settle a major rate case brought by Phillips & Cohen LLP.

Money manager Mario Gabelli and his affiliated companies paid $130 million to the federal government to settle a whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, that alleged he was at the center of an effort to deceive the Federal Communications Commission in auctions of cellphone licenses.

Three former employees of a North Carolina hospital exposed an alleged scheme by Adventist Health System to pay doctors excessive compensation to lock in their patient referrals to Adventist-owned hospitals, clinics and other outpatient services. The whistleblowers were represented by Phillips & Cohen LLP.

Teledyne Inc. paid $115 million to the federal government to settle a “qui tam” (whistleblower) case, brought by Phillips & Cohen, for alleged false certification and overbilling practices.

Northrop Grumman paid $111.2 million to the federal government to settle a whistleblower lawsuit alleging that TRW Inc., which it had recently acquired, padded bills submitted to the government under space and technology contracts.

National Health Laboratories paid the government $110 million to settle a whistleblower case, brought by our attorneys, that alleged NHL performed unnecessary blood tests.

More than 130 hospitals have now reached settlements with the Justice Department totaling $105 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen that alleged that the hospitals overcharged Medicare for a type of back surgery known as kyphoplasty. This includes a recent settlement by 32 hospitals in 15 states that paid more than $28 million to settle Medicare fraud charges.

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. paid $95 million to the government to settle a qui tam lawsuit brought by a sales representative-turned-whistleblower, represented by Phillips & Cohen. The lawsuit alleged Boehringer defrauded Medicare and other government healthcare programs and promoted uses of its drugs that endangered patients’ health.

A whistleblower lawsuit filed by Phillips & Cohen against Verizon resulted in the company paying the federal government $93.5 million to settle allegations that Verizon overcharged the government for voice and data communication services.

A U.S. district judge in Florida awarded a whistleblower, represented by Phillips & Cohen 24 percent of an $85.7 million Medicare fraud settlement, noting that “only his dogged resolution, supported by competent professionals,” achieved the settlement.

A defense contractor paid $82 million to settle a “qui tam” (whistleblower) lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, involving improper cost allocation.

One of the two whistleblower lawsuits that settled as part of Ortho-McNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc.’s and Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical LLC’s $81 million settlement was filed by Dr. Gary R. Spivack, a psychiatrist from northern Virginia, who was represented by Phillips & Cohen LLP.

A subsidiary of Community Health Systems Inc. and three of its New Mexico hospitals paid $75 million to the federal government to settle a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen.

Medtronic Spine LLC, formerly known as Kyphon Inc., paid $75 million to the federal government to settle a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen. The qui tam case exposed the spinal medical device company’s sales and pricing strategy to increase its profits by defrauding Medicare.

A whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, was the basis for the federal government’s fraud case against the Louis Berger Group that settled for $69.3 million — the largest recovery in a case involving war-zone contractors in Afghanistan and Iraq.

More than 1,000 cities, counties, school districts and other government entities in California – including Los Angeles and Santa Clara County – shared a $68.5 million settlement paid by Office Depot for allegedly overcharging them for office supplies. The alleged billing fraud was exposed by a Phillips & Cohen whistleblower client.

Toshiba Corp. paid $63 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, that alleged Toshiba was selling defective laptop computers.

General Electric paid $59.5 million to settle a “qui tam” (whistleblower) lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, that alleged the company diverted foreign military aid.

$55 million was returned to the U.S. Treasury as a result of a “qui tam” (whistleblower) lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen that alleged the hospitals submitted false “cost reports” to Medicare.

Singer Co. paid the government $50 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen that alleged the company submitted false cost and data reporting in its government contracts.

C.R. Bard Inc., a multinational medical device company, paid the federal government $48.2 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen that alleged Bard’s urological division and wholly owned subsidiary, ProSeed Inc., paid doctors and hospitals kickbacks to entice them to order Bard’s products at inflated prices to treat Medicare patients with prostate cancer.

A whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen LLP was the primary basis for a $48 million settlement the federal government made with the Ensign Group involving Medicare billing fraud.

A South Carolina doctor who had ethical concerns about blood testing labs paying physicians extra fees allegedly to get their business was one of the leading whistleblowers in a case, brought by Phillips & Cohen, against two cardiovascular labs. HDL paid the government $48.5 million to settle.

Alpharma Inc. paid $42.5 million to the federal government and certain states to settle a whistleblower lawsuit that exposed an alleged kickback scheme to boost its sales of Kadian, a prescription painkiller.

MetPath and MetWest paid $39.8 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, that alleged the healthcare companies fraudulently billed Medicare for unnecessary blood tests.

The False Claims Act case against a wholly owned subsidiary of Alliant Techsystems (ATK) settled for about $37 million. The whistleblower cases included allegations that ATK sold the U.S. Air Force military flares with dangerous defects.

Two physician practice groups affiliated with the University of Washington paid $35 million to the federal government and the state of Washington to settle a whistleblower lawsuit that said the physician groups routinely overbilled Medicare and Medicaid for years.

A Los Angeles woman who owned and operated two home health agencies paid the federal government $33.8 million to settle a whistleblower case alleging Medicare fraud and pleaded guilty to related criminal charges.

Inter-Tel Technologies paid $33 million to settle allegations — revealed by a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen — of fraudulent bid-rigging in e-rate programs.

Formosa Plastics Corp. USA paid $22.5 million to settle its liability in a whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, involving PVC pipe manufactured by a former subsidiary, JM Eagle.

Four manufacturing companies paid a total of $39 million to dozens of California municipalities and water districts to settle a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen LLP and a related civil complaint that alleged the companies provided substandard parts for water supply systems and that some of those parts contained levels of lead that exceeded industry standards.

A whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, launched the federal investigation into the illegal marketing of the drug Xyrem that resulted in a guilty plea and a $20 million settlement by Orphan Medical Inc., now part of Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc.

A kickback case against Sodexo that settled for $20 million began with the efforts of two whistleblower brothers, who were represented by Phillips & Cohen. They persevered in stopping the alleged fraud even after they were fired by Sodexo.

Omnicare Inc., the nation’s largest pharmacy for nursing homes, paid the federal government and several states $98 million to settle Medicare and Medicaid fraud charges — partially due to a businessman-turned-whistleblower who was represented by Phillips & Cohen.

Chartwells settled a whistleblower lawsuit involving management of school meal programs in Washington, DC, by paying the District a total of $19.4 million. The whistleblower was the former director of food services for DC public schools, who was represented by Phillips & Cohen.

W.R. Grace & Co. and its former book division, Baker & Taylor Inc., paid $18.5 million to settle charges that they defrauded libraries, schools and government offices across the country by deliberately overcharging them for millions of books.

A chain of medical radiology facilities paid the federal government and the states of New York and New Jersey a total of $15.5 million to settle three whistleblower lawsuits – including one filed by Phillips & Cohen LLP – that alleged Medicare and Medicaid billing fraud.

A Houston-area hospital system paid more than $15.5 million to the federal government to settle a whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen that exposed the hospital’s practice of billing Medicare and Medicaid for patients whose treatment wasn’t covered by the federal health programs.

A qui tam lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen  led to Adventist Health paying the federal government and the state of California $14.1 million to settle allegations that an Adventist hospital in Los Angeles illegally paid physician practice groups for patient referrals by inflating other payments the hospital made to the group.

Two prominent figures in the New York City real estate market, a Long Island associate and two Atlanta-based nursing home chains paid the federal government and certain state Medicaid programs $14 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen LLP alleging Medicare and Medicaid fraud involving a kickback and a cover-up.

Allegheny Teledyne paid $13.95 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, alleging billing fraud and improper cost allocation in government contracts.

FMC Corp. paid the federal government $13 million to settle a whistleblower case brought by Phillips & Cohen. The suit alleged FMC deliberately inflated costs of the Bradley Fighting Vehicle, an armored vehicle used in the Gulf War.

SmithKline Beecham PLC paid $325 million to the federal government to settle three whistleblower lawsuits, including one brought by Phillips & Cohen. The lawsuits alleged the company’s clinical-laboratory unit defrauded the Medicare and Medicaid programs through various schemes, including deliberately overcharging the federal programs for blood tests.

Northrop Grumman paid $12.5 million to settle fraud charges that were brought to the government’s attention by a company manager, represented by Phillips & Cohen, in its Salt Lake City, Utah, plant.

Integris Baptist Medical Center paid $12.2 million to the federal government to settle a whistleblower lawsuit that alleged the Oklahoma City hospital substantially overbilled Medicare for the cost of acquiring organs that it transplanted into Medicare patients.

SAIC paid the federal government $11.75 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, that alleged SAIC cheated the government out of millions of dollars under a “first responder” training program.

CA Technologies paid $11 million to settle whistleblower allegations that the software giant violated the federal False Claims Act through the fraudulent billing of hundreds of public agencies on software maintenance renewal contracts from 2001 through 2009.

MetPath Inc. and Unilab Corp. paid $11 million to the federal government and the states of Georgia and California to settle a whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, that alleged they had bilked Medicare and other state and federal health insurance programs by obtaining excessive reimbursements when billing for laboratory tests.

Corning Clinical Laboratories paid $11 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, that alleged the healthcare company billed the government for unnecessary blood tests.

Damon Clinical Laboratories Inc. paid $9.8 million in criminal and civil fines to settle a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen that was part of a broader settlement for $119 million. The whistleblowers and the government charged that the company had submitted false claims to Medicare and other federal insurance programs for laboratory tests that were not ordered and were not medically necessary.

Tenet Healthcare Corp. paid a total of $55.75 million to the federal government to settle numerous allegations of Medicare fraud, including those in a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen LLP involving Brotman Medical Center, a Tenet owned-and-operated facility in the Los Angeles area.

Accounting giant KPMG LLP paid $9 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit that alleged the firm helped Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp. — now HCA — prepare and later conceal false claims in Medicare “cost reports” that defrauded Medicare of millions of dollars.

U.S. Renal Care paid $7.3 million to the federal government to settle a whistleblower lawsuit — brought by a nurse represented by Phillips & Cohen — that alleged a company U.S. Renal Care acquired, Dialysis Corporation of America (DCA), overcharged Medicare for an anemia drug used to treat dialysis patients.

A prominent Boca Raton radiologist and owner of several medical scanning centers in southern Florida paid $7 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit and government charges that he fraudulently billed Medicare for CT scans and other medical imaging tests that were not ordered, not medically necessary and often never even performed.

Hewlett Packard Co. and Agilent Technologies Inc. paid a total of $7 million to the federal government to settle charges that they knowingly sold defective medical monitoring devices to federal government agencies and failed to investigate or correct the problems.

Sharp Memorial Hospital paid the federal government $6.2 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, that alleged it defrauded Medicare by filing fraudulent claims for reimbursement for costs associated with its heart and kidney transplant centers.

Providian Financial Corp., one of the nation’s largest credit card issuers, and Total System Services Inc., a processor of credit card payments, paid the government $6 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen LLP that alleged the companies defrauded the U.S. Postal Service.

CSX Transportation paid the government $6 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit, brought by Phillips & Cohen, that alleged it overcharged on government contracts.

A company that routinely recycled the unused drugs of deceased nursing home patients and sold them over and over again to Medicaid for other nursing home patients paid the government $5.3 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit and civil charges for defrauding Medicaid.

Hughes Aircraft Company paid $4.05 million to the U.S. Treasury to settle a whistleblower lawsuit that charged the company had routinely lied about conducting important quality assurance tests of certain components used in missiles, fighter planes and other military systems.

American Systems Corporation, Anixter International Inc., and Corning Cable Systems LLC paid $3 million to settle allegations in a qui tam lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen that they violated the False Claims Act and the Anti-Kickback Act in bidding on a contract with the CIA.

Hawthorn Pharmaceuticals Inc. and its parent company, Cypress Pharmaceutical Inc., paid the federal government $2.8 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit filed by Phillips & Cohen LLP that alleged Hawthorn falsely marketed unapproved prescription drugs as being eligible for reimbursement by Medicaid and other government health care programs.

A South Carolina doctor, represented by Phillips & Cohen, who had ethical concerns about blood testing labs paying physicians extra fees allegedly to get their business was one of the leading whistleblowers in a case against two cardiovascular labs that the government settled for $48.5 million.

ev3, a wholly owned subsidiary of medical device company Covidien PLC (now Medtronic Inc.), paid $1.25 million to the federal government to settle a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen LLP.

Gilbane Building Co., a privately held construction company with global operations, paid the government $1.1 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit brought by Phillips & Cohen LLP that claimed a company it had acquired had fraudulently obtained government construction business that was intended for small businesses owned by disabled military veterans.

Rocky Mountain Instrument Co. paid $1 million to the federal government to settle civil charges related to the illegal export of sensitive military information for the manufacture of certain equipment overseas. It was apparently the first time the False Claims Act has been used in connection with violations of International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and the Arms Control Export Act.

Let us help you.
Get a free, confidential case review